A Music App Could Soon Replace Your Therapist

A Music App Could Soon Replace Your Therapist
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It is possible for music to alter a person’s mental state, and it has the ability to divert listeners’ attention away from painful or negative ideas. Memory, performance, and mood are all areas that have been shown to benefit from its application. An application developed by Man Hei Law of Hong Kong University of Science and Technology will be presented at the forthcoming meeting of the Acoustical Society of America. This application generates individualized playlists to assist listeners in managing their feelings through the use of music.

People who, perhaps due to emotions of guilt, inadequacy, or distrust, do not wish to get counseling or treatment could utilize the app instead. The app’s goal is to leave users in a more upbeat and centered condition than they were in before they started using it by putting them through a series of challenging emotional experiences.

The software prompts users to complete three self-guided quizzes that measure their emotional level and offer the information that is required to construct a playlist. A visual evaluation tool that helps detect emotions in regards of energy level and mood is used to determine both the current state of emotions as well as the status of emotions over a longer period of time.

The individual’s energy level might range from high to medium to low, and their mood can be positive, neutral, or negative at any given moment. In addition, a Patient Health Questionnaire and a screening for General Anxiety Disorder are utilized in the process of developing individualized treatment plans for music therapy.

The user’s current emotional state is analyzed by the application, which then generates a personalized and carefully arranged playlist of music with the intent of either calming the listener down, cheering them up, or relieving stress. The energy and mood of the listener are reflected in reassuring music, whereas relaxing music produces a positive atmosphere with a low level of energy. Music that is uplifting is likewise positive, but it has a higher intensity level.


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Anna Daniels

Anna is an avid blogger with an educational background in medicine and mental health. She is a generalist with many other interests including nutrition, women's health, astronomy and photography. In her free time from work and writing, Anna enjoys nature walks, reading, and listening to jazz and classical music.

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