Yellowstone Supervolcano Shows An Alarmingly Risk Of Hydrothermal Eruption

Yellowstone Supervolcano Shows An Alarmingly Risk Of Hydrothermal Eruption
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Which are the causes of a hydrothermal explosion? Scientists are warning us: increased chances of hydrothermal explosion for Yellowstone supervolcano. Magma has reached a risky spot at the Norris Geyser Basin, a new study published in the Journal of Geophysical Research reveals.

When did this on-going research start?

The research focuses on determining the factors that caused surface deformation in Yellowstone Caldera. This topic has been highly debated in the past two decades. The uplift phenomena had begun in the last months of 2013. The massive earthquake of 30 March 2014 has resulted in an abrupt uplift. Additionally, further research has demonstrated the presence of the magma intrusion phenomena since 1996.

Which spots would be the most likely to erupt?

Today’s findings have demonstrated that the magma is usually positioned to the surface or maximum one mile below the ground level. The risk of hydrothermal eruptions in the Steamboat Geyser and in the Noris Geyser Area is shown in the deformation of the surfaces.

Yellowstone supervolcano might erupt, scientists warned

The co-author of the research, Daniel Dzurisin, declared in National Geographic that the Norris Geyser has probably been the core of deformation for an extended period.

However, the study does not say that the supervolcano will likely erupt in the upcoming future, even though the threat of an aggressive explosion is continuously felt. Its primary focus is to determine the causes of why the Steamboat Geyser has been erupting for the past two years at such a record-breaking point.

Do we know when we should expect the next eruption?

Jacob Lowerstern, the scientist in charge of Yellowstone supervolcano, claimed in 2014 that after a logical row of calculations, the next eruption is going to be in 70.000 years from now on. However, the recent observations suggest that something is happening right now. It might not be an eruption, though.


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