Wild Bee Species Crucial to Pollination ​Are In Decline

Wild Bee Species Crucial to Pollination ​Are In Decline
SHARE

Researchers from the University of New Hampshire conducted a study which concluded in the fact that more than a dozen of wild bee species which are critical to pollination in New England are on the decline. The team wanted to see if the studied drops targeting honeybees and bumblebees were also harming the lesser examined bee species in New Hampshire.

Researchers analyzed 119 species in the state from a museum selection dating back 125 years. Sandra Rehan and Minna Mathiason’s study completed with the conclusion that 14 species were on the decline by basically 90 percent. They published the findings of their research in the peer-reviewed journal Insect and Conservation Diversity​, this month.

Because these species of bees are crucial for crop pollination, it raises concerns about the jeopardy of the crop productions and the food stock, Rehan, assistant professor of biological sciences and the senior author of the study stated.

Wild Bee Species Crucial to Pollination ​Are In Decline

All across the world, wild bee species have been on a severe decline for as much as a decade, and researchers accuse a series of factors including insecticides, parasites, diseases and so on.

Bees are crucial for pollination and around third of the human diet comes from plants that are pollinated by insects. Rehan said she hopes that the conducted study would encourage other scientists to observe these rarely studied bee species and to try to understand the cause of the decline, for the experiment couldn’t show a probable cause besides the climate change.

For saving these wild bee species, wild bee species that are faring better could give some clues, Rehan said. Eight species from the studied collection had their numbers increasing in New Hampshire. She also added that scientists could use the success of the wild bees which are growing to create management strategies for those faring worse.


SHARE

Share this post

Post Comment

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.