Watch Live Webcast of the SpaceX Falcon Booster as Heading to Collision With the Moon

Watch Live Webcast of the SpaceX Falcon Booster as Heading to Collision With the Moon
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You don’t see or hear every day about rockets that are on a collision course with a planet or a natural satellite. But it’s the case for a Falcon booster built by SpaceX, and you can be among the lucky ones who can watch the rocket heading for its demise in a live webcast.

We spoke before about the rocket being on a collision course with the Moon. The spacecraft was launched a few years ago from Florida, and it spent all this time hurtling through space.

The Virtual Telescope in Italy offers live footage

Space.com informs us that starting at 2 pm. EST (1900 GMT), you can watch some relevant live footage offered by the Virtual Telescope from Italy of the rocket as it’s heading towards the Moon. The impact itself will occur in March, however, but that doesn’t mean that the live footage is not worth viewing.

Gianluca Masi, who works at the Virtual Telescope project, explains the importance of the live stream as Space.com quotes:

About one month earlier, it will be visible from Earth for the last time and we will show it live to the world,

On 8 Feb., in particular, [the rocket booster] will be at its brightest and closest to our planet, moving very fast across the stars.

What happened is that the rocket broke out of control after sending the Deep Space Climate Observatory of NOAA to the Lagrange point. There wasn’t enough fuel left for the rocket to come back home. At the same time, the rocket couldn’t escape the gravity imposed by the Earth-Moon system.

NASA hopes to return humans to the Moon during the Artemis mission that should start in 2025. No astronaut has laid foot on our natural satellite for about half a century, but it seems that it’s always time to change things when it comes to space exploration.

 


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Cristian Antonescu

Even since he was a child, Cristian was staring curiously at the stars, wondering about the Universe and our place in it. Today he's seeing his dream come true by writing about the latest news in astronomy. Cristian is also glad to be covering health and other science topics, having significant experience in writing about such fields.

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