The Sun Is Unusually Calm At This Moment, New Research Revealed

The Sun Is Unusually Calm At This Moment, New Research Revealed
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A new study argues that in comparison to other stars, our Sun is quite calm. The Sun was compared with hundreds of similar stars, and many of them appear to be considerably stronger. It might be possible that the Sun has been in a quiet phase for several thousands of years.

The timeframe for accurate measurements varies in accordance with the various methods that can be used. For example, scientists have used sunspots to track the activity of the Sun from 1610.

By observing the distribution of radioactive elements in the growth rings of trees and ice cores, it is also possible to estimate the intensity of the solar activity for the last 9000 years. As stars can shine for billions of years, 9000 years is a bit far from being an impressive amount, especially since the Sun is already 4.6 billion years old.

The Sun Is Much Too Calm For A Star Of Its Type

There is no way to determine how active the Sun was millions or billions of years ago. Hence, a team of interested researchers decided to see how active the Sun is in comparison to other stars.

Several criteria were used to find suitable candidates for the study as the researchers took into account the surface temperature, age, proportion, and distribution of heavy elements and the rotation period, among others.

The rotation period is a crucial element in this case, as the process contributes to the formation of the magnetic field. The magnetic field can influence several phenomena, including the appearance of sunspots, the intensity of energy waves, and the appearance of solar storms.

A list of 369 suitable candidates had been selected, and the results are quite impressive. The fluctuations encountered among most of the other stars tend to be up to five times more intense. While it is theorized that the Sun is currently in a calmer stage, more data is needed before definite conclusions can be reached.


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