The New Year Brings Up to 90 Shooting Stars Per Hour

The New Year Brings Up to 90 Shooting Stars Per Hour
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We all have to be honest and say that 2020 wasn’t the perfect year for any of us. But 2021 will debut with an impressive celestial show, meaning that stargazers have a new reason to grab their binoculars while relaxing on a chair during the night. The reason is called the Quadrantids meteor shower.

Those willing to feast their eyes on the meteor shower will get to witness up to 90 shooting stars per hour during the peak of the event this weekend. Choosing a spot far from city lights is the best way to enjoy the immersive celestial show.

Don’t miss the Saturday night

The Quadrantids will show in their full glory during Saturday night, January 2nd. The meteors are famous for showcasing imposing fireballs on the sky, although the full Moon will outshine most of them. According to NASA, the Quadrantids are among the best annual meteor showers.

The Quadrantids are different also because an asteroid produces them. Usually, meteor showers belong to the dust of a comet. The meteors that we’re waiting for have the asteroid 2003 EH1 as the parent body.

Wikipedia tells us that (196256) 2003 EH1 is an asteroid classified as a near-Earth object, and it’s part of the Amor group.

2003 EH1 was discovered back in 2003 by astronomers who were participating in the LONEOS program at Anderson Mesa Station. The location is near Flagstaff, Arizona, in the United States.

If you cannot arrive on time to witness the Quadrantids meteor shower on January 2nd, there’s no use getting upset just yet. You still have time to feast your eyes on the show until January 12th, although you won’t get the full package of up to 90 shooting stars per hour.

 

 


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