TESS, The Next NASA’s Exoplanet Hunter, Will Launch On Monday With A SpaceX Falcon 9 Rocket

TESS, The Next NASA’s Exoplanet Hunter, Will Launch On Monday With A SpaceX Falcon 9 Rocket
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NASA’s TESS, the next exoplanet hunter, will launch on Monday with a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket. The launch, under normal circumstances, will commence on Monday morning, starting at 6:32 EDT, from the Launch Complex 40 from the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, in Florida, in the USA. TESS will then position itself on a 13.7-day orbit.

Kepler, who has discovered over 4500 planets and exoplanets, was placed on the Earth’s orbit in 2009. Unfortunately, he had a mechanical problem in 2013 and had to change his mission, to some extent.

Since then, NASA researchers have learned a lot about the stars’ formation and evolution, supernovae, and, last but not least, about black holes.

Kepler will be abandoned in the cosmos and will orbit around the sun being unable to ever come closer to Earth more than the distance between the Earth and the Moon and TESS will replace it in the search for exoplanets capable of hosting life.

TESS (Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite) will launch on Monday morning on board of a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket

TESS, or the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite, is a device with which NASA is going to look for exoplanets that could host life. As said, it will be launched in orbit from Cape Canaveral, Florida, on April 16th, and will continue the job done by the Kepler Space Telescope, which was the NASA’s primary exoplanets observer but which will soon run low on fuel.

TESS will have enough fuel to get into the planned orbit and to get its mission done for at least 2 years. This satellite will cover an area 400 times larger than the Kepler Space Telescope and is scheduled to study more than 200,000 nearby stars.

NASA’s TESS (Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite), which will launch on Monday with a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket, will identify transiting exoplanets by being able to notice the dimming of the intensity of the starlight as the planets pass by.


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