Supermassive Black Hole In The Milky Way Made A Star Go Rogue

Supermassive Black Hole In The Milky Way Made A Star Go Rogue
SHARE

In the middle of the Milky Way, there is a supermassive black hole which generates an extraordinary gravitational pull. The forces generated by these supermassive black holes are so intense that they can absorb light, and it was believed that once an object is caught by it, there is no way to escape. A team of researchers was quite surprised when they tracked down a star which travels at a spectacular speed of four million miles per hour. The star has been classified under the name of S5-HVS1.

By analyzing the trajectory followed by the star, the scientists discovered that it had traveled alone in the last 4.8 million years after it was set in motion by our supermassive black hole. Data collected during the study inferred that the trajectory would lead back to the Galactic Center. Further observations suggest that it was once part of a binary star system, which is composed of two stars tie into an orbit around each other. It was likely forced to leave this system due to the interaction with the supermassive black hole.

Milky Way’s Supermassive Black Hole Made The Star Go Rogue

Many researchers were puzzled by the fact that Sagittarius A*, the supermassive black hole located in the heart of our galaxy, seems to be considerably less active in comparison to some of its peers encountered in other galaxies. Since it is located at approximately 25,640 light-years away to chances of it interacting with Earth are slim. Other supermassive black holes will consume everything which surrounds them and emits powerful pulses of radiation.

A team of researchers decided to explore the magnetic fields which surrounded Sagittarius A* and found out that the supermassive black hole redirects the cosmic gas and forces it to orbit around it. If the gas targeted the black hole, it would trigger a powerful phenomenon. Further research is already underway as the researchers want to learn more about the star and the forces which propelled it into the void. The paper was published in a scientific journal.


SHARE

Share this post

Post Comment

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.