Superflares Ejected By The Sun Might Ruin The Earth In The Future

Superflares Ejected By The Sun Might Ruin The Earth In The Future
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Astronomers have managed to seriously worry us with theories that solar superflares might cause significant damage to the planet and its population in the next 100 years. Solar energy and cosmic radiation burst from the surface of our star in the form of a charge particle lash. These are rare occurrences for this scale but they are scheduled to visit the Earth every few thousand years, marking the following century as the next house call.

Superflares released by the Sun would cause significant losses in terms of satellites, communications, power networks, and general infrastructure that is sensitive in nature.

Scientists are just recently discovering that more stable stars, such as our Sun, are capable of causing such phenomena known as superflares. Until now, it was previously thought that only young stars are able to eject such powerful solar flares. The discovery was made with the help of NASA’s Kepler Space Telescope.

Superflares Ejected By The Sun Might Ruin The Earth In The Future

Being launched in 2009, the Kepler Space Telescope captured moments when stars had massive, short burst of brightness; also known as superflares.

The news will be presented by astronomer Yuta Notsu as a “wake up call” at the 234th meeting of the American Astronomical Society in St Louis, Missouri in June. Notsu says that the probability of this occurring is high and that infrastructure will be more or less shut down when it comes to technology. Which is pretty much all of it.

“When our Sun was young, it was very active because it rotated very fast and probably generated more powerful flares. But we didn’t know if such large flares occur on the modern Sun with very low frequency. If a superflare occurred 1,000 years ago, it was probably no big problem. People may have seen a large aurora Now, its a much bigger problem because of our electronics,” said Yuta Notsu.


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