Stargazer’s Delight: Watch Footage of Top Meteor Showers That Illuminate the Night Sky Every Year

Stargazer’s Delight: Watch Footage of Top Meteor Showers That Illuminate the Night Sky Every Year
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Meteor showers could be nature’s way of telling us both how majestic it is and how vulnerable we truly are if it unleashes its wrath. For the moment, it seems that someone up there still loves us, as meteor showers usually don’t cause any trouble for our planet. Those sparkling and quick meteors emerging on the night sky disintegrate easily into the atmosphere due to air friction and their enormous speed.

Each and every year, we have the privilege of witnessing meteor showers dancing in the night sky and practically telling us how small we are in the Cosmos. Nobody has asked for our permission to ignite and land those meteors above our heads as far as we know.

Leonids:
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The Leonids meteor shower takes place every year in mid-November, and their peak takes place around November 17-18. These celestial objects are associated with the comet known as Tempel-Tuttle and have received their name after the Leo constellation.

The Leonids are also known for occasional meteor storms, as rates can exceed hundreds or even thousands of meteors every hour.

Perseids:
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The Perseids represent another interesting meteor shower that occurs every year – from mid-July to late August, to be more precise. The peak takes place around August 11-13. This meteor shower is associated with the Comet Swift-Tuttle and is named after the constellation Perseus. The Perseid meteor shower can even produce bright fireballs, making this meteor shower one of Stargazers’ favorites.

Draconids:
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The Draconids meteor shower is active in early October, while the peak takes place around October 8-9. The phenomenon is associated with the periodic comet 21P/Giacobini-Zinner and has received its name after the constellation known as Draco. It’s worth keeping in mind that the Draconids usually produce low rates of meteors, but they occasionally experience outbursts of activity, causing higher rates than usual.

Geminids:
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Geminids is the moniker for a meteor shower that’s active from early to mid-December, while the peak takes place around December 13-14. Unlike most meteor showers, which are associated with comets, the Geminids have their origin in an asteroid known as 3200 Phaethon. This meteor shower is known for an abundance of meteors and can even produce imposing and bright fireballs of various colors.

Quadrantids:
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The Quadrantis represents a meteor shower that’s active in early January, while the peak takes place during the first days of the year, around January 3-4. This meteor shower is associated with the asteroid known as 2003 EH1, which is thought to be a piece of a comet that broke itself apart a few centuries ago. Although the Quadrantis have a relatively short peak, the meteor shower is able to produce high rates of meteors, including some fireballs that can be extremely bright.

Orionids:
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If you don’t have plans for late October, it means you should definitely look at the night sky. That’s because the Orionids meteor shower will have its peak around October 21-22. These meteors are associated with Halley’s Comet and have received their name after the famous constellation Orion, as you’ve probably already guessed. The Orionids are usually fast-moving meteors, which can also leave long-lasting trails across the night sky.

Unfortunately, while the vast majority of meteors disintegrate into the Earth’s atmosphere as the result of their huge speed and air friction, that’s not the case for all of them. For instance, a case was reported last year when a chunk of material the size of a grapefruit belonging to a meteor landed through the ceiling of a house.


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Even since he was a child, Cristian was staring curiously at the stars, wondering about the Universe and our place in it. Today he's seeing his dream come true by writing about the latest news in astronomy. Cristian is also glad to be covering health and other science topics, having significant experience in writing about such fields.

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