Soyuz Launch Failure: The Two NASA and Roscosmos Astronauts Are In Good Condition

Soyuz Launch Failure: The Two NASA and Roscosmos Astronauts Are In Good Condition
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Earlier, a Soyuz launch failure forced two NASA and Roscosmos astronauts to make an emergency landing after one of the rocket’s boosters malfunctioned in mid-air. Following the took off the Soyuz rocket made at 4:40 AM (EDT) from the Ruscosmos’s Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan, one of the spacecraft’s boosters failed in mid-air putting the mission to an end.

The Soyuz rocket was scheduled to fly the NASA astronaut Nick Hague and the Russian Alexei Ovchinin to the ISS. Unfortunately, only a few minutes after launch, one of the rocket’s boosters malfunctioned, forcing the astronauts to make an emergency landing in the steppes of Kazakhstan, near the city of Dzhezkazgan.

However, luckily, both astronauts landed safely and are now in good condition, according to both NASA and Roscosmos, Russia’s space agency. “Thank God, the crew is alive,” also said Dmitry Peskov, Russian President Vladimir Putin’s spokesman.

This Soyuz launch failure is the most significant malfunction in the history of the Russian space program, and it comes in a period when Roscosmos is experiencing many downsides.

Two NASA and Roscosmos astronauts forced to make an emergency landing after a Soyuz launch failure occurred

The Soyuz rocket was scheduled to launch at 4:40 AM (EDT), and it would’ve docked to the International Space Station, six hours later at 10:40 AM (EDT). However, that did not happen as one of the rocket’s boosters malfunctioned, forcing the two astronauts aboard, NASA’s Nick Hague and Roscosmos’s Alexei Ovchinin, to decouple the module which entered in a ballistic descent. Luckily, everything went okay, and the two crew members landed safely in the steppes of Kazakhstan.

According to NASA, the rescuers reached the emergency landing location shortly after the module touched the ground. Fortunately, the astronauts were not injured, now both of them being in good condition.

This Soyuz launch failure comes after another event hit Russia’s space agency, Roscosmos, recently. Just a month ago, the ISS crew detected an oxygen leak caused by a hole in the hull of the Soyuz module docked to the International Space Station.


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