Significant SpaceX Crew Dragon Test To Take Place Soon

Significant SpaceX Crew Dragon Test To Take Place Soon
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SpaceX has been hard at work as a recent static-fire test of the Falcon 9 booster was performed without issues on January 11. The Falcon 9 rocket fired its nine main engines at the Kennedy Space Center. SpaceX has confirmed that a new test will take place on January 18, with the star being the Crew Dragon.

During the launch, the engineers will verify the performance of the SuperDraco launch abort thrusters mounded on the capsule. These thrusters are essential for safety reasons since they can propel the capsule away from the rocket if a problem is encountered during launch. In the case of such an event, the capsule will employ parachutes to perform a splashdown in the waters of the Atlantic.

According to a NASA representative, the separation process should require 88 seconds after liftoff. A capsule that was built for the Demo-2 crewed test flight will be used since the capsule that was scheduled for the test was compromised during a test that took place in April 2019.

Significant SpaceX Crew Dragon Test To Take Place Soon

The initial schedule anticipated that the in-flight abort test would take place during the summer. However, the NASA representative appreciated the determination of the company and the implementation of swift changes within a limited timeframe. Advanced simulations infer that the separation process will take place when the rocket reaches an altitude between 14.6 and 27.8 kilometers while traveling at a speed range between Mach 1.5 and 2.5.

It is worth noting that the in-flight abort test is one of the final tests that have to be passed before the Demo-2 crewed test will be cleared. If everything goes according to plan, two astronauts will be taken to the International Space Station with the help of the Crew Dragon spacecraft.

The mission is scheduled for launch in February, but safety is a priority, and some delays could take place. The Falcon 9 stage will be destroyed due to the nature of the test.


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