SETI Shared A groundbreaking Dataset Of Deep Space Scans For Alien Life

SETI Shared A groundbreaking Dataset Of Deep Space Scans For Alien Life
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A study led by the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI) project based in California shared a groundbreaking dataset of deep space scans for alien life. The team of researchers performed scans on more than 1,300 alien stars, analyzing every artificial signal, radio wave, or any other proof of advanced life they could find. Summed up, the data they gathered represents more than one Petabyte (PB), which equals streaming music for 1,600 years.

A partnership between the University of California, Berkley, and the Green Bank Telescope and the Parkes Telescope made the scans possible. Now, the alien scans are available to the public, so curious people all around the world can check them out, thanks to the UC Berkeley Breakthrough Listen initiative.

The Breakthrough Listen team scans nearby stars in search for technosignatures or any other form of evidence that could suggest the existence of artificially built technology. The team believes that any existing alien civilization in the universe could be broadcasting communication signals.

SETI Shared A groundbreaking Dataset Of Deep Space Scans For Alien Life

Scientists made it their mission to record any unusual radio frequency, bright laser or other signs of extraterrestrial technology. Researchers are currently keeping an eye on more than 1,700 stars, using the Green Bank Radio Telescope (GBT) and the CSIRO Parkes Radio Telescope. Soon, with the aid of the MeerKAT telescope, the research is expected to extend to more than one million stars.

Matt Lebofsky, one of the researchers, said: “While we have been making smaller subsets of data public before in varying forms and contexts, we are excited and proud to offer this first cohesive collection along with an instruction manual, so everybody can dig in and help us search. And we’re just getting started – there’s much more to come!”

The collected data can be accessed by anyone online through the Breakthrough Listen Open Data Archive.


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