Scientists Discover New Species of Dinosaur That Was a True Menace for the Tyrannosaurs

Scientists Discover New Species of Dinosaur That Was a True Menace for the Tyrannosaurs
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Tyrannosaurs were among the biggest and fierce dinosaurs that have ever roamed the Earth. Knowing that even such creatures were afraid of others is indeed fascinating, and it proves once again that no species is invincible.

According to Fox News, paleontologists have unearthed the fossils of a new dinosaur that was likely capable of teaching some manners into some tyrannosaurs species. The rock containing the creatures’ remnants is about 90 million years old, and it was found in the Bissekty Formation.

Meet the Ulughbegsaurus uzbekistanensis carcharodontosaur

The remnants of the newfound dinosaur belong to a carcharodontosaur known as the Ulughbegsaurus uzbekistanensis. We know that the moniker is too difficult to remember, which is why you can simply call it “the terror of the tyrannosaurs”. Also, the newly-discovered dinosaurs were allosauroids.

Credit: Pixabay.com
Credit: Pixabay.com

Allosauroidea is a superfamily/clade of theropod dinosaurs, and it contains four families: the Metriacanthosauridae, Carcharodontosauridae, Allosauridae, and Neovenatoridae.

Darla Zelenitsky, who’s a paleontologist from the University of Calgary, declared as quoted by FoxNews.com:

I think that any finds we can make in or around the 90- to 80-million-year-old window can help shed light on this poorly-known interval of dinosaur-dominated ecosystems.

Stephen Brusatte, a paleontologist from the University of Edinburgh, declared as also quoted by FoxNews.com:

Given that allosauroids were holding back tyrannosaurs for so many tens of millions of years,

I can’t envision that tyrannosaurs suddenly figured out how to out-compete the allosauroids.

National Geographic explains why tyrannosaurus rex is among the most ferocious predators that ever walked our planet. These creatures possessed sharp teeth, powerful jaws that could crush a car, and a massive body.
In total, there were about 700 species of dinosaurs that ever lived on Earth.


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Cristian Antonescu

Even since he was a child, Cristian was staring curiously at the stars, wondering about the Universe and our place in it. Today he's seeing his dream come true by writing about the latest news in astronomy. Cristian is also glad to be covering health and other science topics, having significant experience in writing about such fields.

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