Satellite Images Showcase the Anak Krakatoa Eruption

Satellite Images Showcase the Anak Krakatoa Eruption
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A series of satellite images released by NASA showcase the intensity of the Anak Krakatoa eruption, which began last week, as Fox News reported. The massive volcano is located in Indonesia. It is one of the younger volcanoes, as it formed in the aftermath of the gigantic Krakatoa eruption, which took place in 1883.

Sporadic activity had been observed since its formation, and the volcano has been more active in recent years. A large-scale underwater collapse took place in 2018, leading to the creation of a massive tsunami wave that more than 400 hundred people and injured almost 15,000 thousand.

On April 10, 2020, a new eruption could be heard across a distance of 150 kilometers as the volcano started to release as and smoke. Data recorded with the help of scientific instruments infers that the initial eruption lasted for 72 seconds.

The Anak Krakatoa Eruption

A team of researchers harnessed a particular device that is placed on the Terra satellite to trace the features of a massive volcanic plume that floats over the volcano. The device can measure the size, shape, and type of particles that are present within the plume, and it seems that Anak Krakatoa released it.

Interestingly, the darker segment of the plume seems to float at a lower attitude in comparison to brighter segments that can be found around the volcano. One of the researchers involved in the project has mentioned that the ash particles found in the darker parts of the plume may be more substantial, a trait that also makes them more susceptible to near-surface winds.

The Indonesian Center of Vulcanology has announced a level 2 alert. This threat level involves increased risks of escalation and potential eruption in an unspecified timeframe. Anak Krakatoa may not erupt as violently as the original Krakatau volcano, but it can generate dangerous tsunamis that pose a higher risk for local populations.


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