Researchers Filmed The Immune System Killing Bacteria

Researchers Filmed The Immune System Killing Bacteria
SHARE

The new research was issued in the journal Nature Communications and conducted by UCL scientists takes us on a journey of a better understanding of the way our immune system annihilates bacteria. Scientists have been filming the nanomachines our immune system needs to kill the bacteria in operation, in the process also identifying the main impediment which aids in protecting our own cells.

New therapies development might serve this particular study as a guide on how to control the immune system facing bacterial infections, also on tactics to refocus the immune system to operate on other rogue cells.

Scientists have captured images of the characteristics of attack in live bacteria in previous studies, demonstrating that the immune system reaction concludes in ‘bullet holes’ extended all over the cell covers of bacteria. The deadly holes are extremely small, with a size of just 10 nanometers.

Researchers Filmed The Immune System Killing Bacteria

Researchers have imitated the process in which the holes are shaped by the membrane attack complex (MAC), utilizing a prototype bacterial surface for this specific research. By monitoring every phase of the process, they discovered that immediately after every hole started to take shape, the procedure delayed, providing a remission for the body’s cells.

Dr. Edward Parsons from UCL London Centre for Nanotechnology explained that it seems like the nanomachines wait a bit, permitting their target to interfere in the event that it is one of the body’s own cells and not an attacking bacteria before they apply the fatal shot.

Researchers detailed that the procedure delays because there are needed 18 copies of the same protein to form a hole. There is a single copy at the beginning which embeds into the bacterial surface, and then the rest of the copies squeeze in much more quickly. The research team utilized atomic force microscopy to capture the immune system while fighting at nanometer degree, and at a couple of seconds per set.


SHARE

Share this post

Post Comment

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.