Raw Water Turns Out To Be a Scam In More Ways than One

Raw Water Turns Out To Be a Scam In More Ways than One
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When the newest health craze hit the Silicon Valley health nuts, scientists vigorously shook their heads. We’re of course talking about the new “raw water” fad, claiming that unfiltered, untreated, “unsterilized” water brings many health benefits, whereas normal, treated tap water is the bane of a healthy existence. Of course, to reap the “benefits” of raw water, Live Water – the company which originated this trend – would charge customers up to $16 for 11 liters of “pure spring water”. Well, according to an article published in Men’s Health, the “Fountain of Truth” raw water is virtually identical to tap water from Oregon.

Live Water claims to source their pristine water from Opal Springs, Oregon, a natural spring at the bottom of a canyon next to the city of Madras. According to Edison Pugh, general manager of the Deschutes Valley Water District, Live Water isn’t sourcing the water from this spring, at least not directly. If they are indeed selling water from Oregon, Mr. Pugh made it abundantly clear that his institution provides Opal Springs tap water from Jefferson County, Oregon, not from the local spring. The difference is that people in Opal Springs pay about 1 cent for 2.5 gallons (11 liters) of the same water San Franciscans pay $16 dollars for. Did we mention that you have to buy at least 4 jugs of “Fountain of Truth”? That brings the tally up to $64. Versus 4 cents. Of the same water.

Of course, in the face of such a bare-faced scam and money shake-down, preying on people’s insecurities and health concerns, a lot of early adopters of this fad will have trouble admitting they’ve been duped. For goodness’ sake, if a health website can truly contribute something to the well-being of humanity, this is it – we won’t blame you, folks. We won’t mock you. Just stop the madness, cut your losses, and accept that even the best of us get fooled sometimes. It’s time to let this dangerous fad go the way of the dodo.


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