Quantum Internet: Stable Quantum Entanglement Puts The Basis For The Internet Of The Future

Quantum Internet: Stable Quantum Entanglement Puts The Basis For The Internet Of The Future
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It is inevitable not to hear of private data theft, cyber attacks, privacy leaks, and so on. We need more secure connections to protect our privacy, and quantum internet, based on quantum entanglement, will be the solution.

In theory, the quantum internet is based on nodes via which the information is instantaneously transmitted using the quantum entanglement principle. This type of connection can’t be hacked because any unauthorized access would only lead to the deterioration of the data before any private data leaks.

Quantum entanglement is a complex phenomenon. According to it, two different particles can become so tightly connected in a quantum system that, regardless of the distance between them, by looking at the state of one of them, you could quickly and precisely estimate the state of the other.

The researchers put the basis of the quantum internet, using quantum entanglement

Even though this idea might sound complicated or taken from Sci-Fi movies, in fact, a team of researchers from the Delft University of Technology has put the basis for the future quantum internet.

However, there is a big downside that prevented the implementation of a stable quantum internet. Namely, quantum entanglement between two network’s nodes (particles) wasn’t fast enough and didn’t last long enough to transmit the data to a third node.

That, until now, as the team of researchers from the Delft University of Technology, in the Netherlands, announced the development of a quantum entanglement that is faster and lasts long enough to transmit the data.

The scientists yielded this important result by linking two electrons attached to diamond chips, at about 6 ft one between the other. However, the experiment is small-scale, but the researchers plan to come up with a stable quantum network with multiple nodes in 2020.

“In 2020, we want to connect four cities in the Netherlands via quantum entanglement. This would be the first quantum internet in the worlds,” said Ronald Hanson, the leading author of the experiment.


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