Powerful Solar Storm Could Jeopardize GPS and Cell Phones Functionality Very Soon

Powerful Solar Storm Could Jeopardize GPS and Cell Phones Functionality Very Soon
SHARE

Our planet will be hit by a powerful solar storm these days, and it could cause some trouble to our cell phones and GPS signals. Solar flares generally send tons of energy travelling through space at the speed of light.

The news about the upcoming solar storm is brought by The Tribune publication, and according to Spaceweather.com, the Sun’s atmosphere is responsible for the event. The original post reads:

THE SOLAR WIND IS COMING: Later today, a high-speed stream of solar wind is expected to hit Earth’s magnetic field. Flowing from an equatorial hole in the Sun’s atmosphere, wind speeds could top 500 km/s. Full-fledged geomagnetic storms are unlikely, but lesser geomagnetic unrest could spark high latitude auroras. Aurora alerts: SMS Text.

According to Wonderopolis, a solar storm can occur when our Sun emits enormous bursts of energy that manifest as solar flares, as well as coronal mass ejections. A stream of electrical charges and magnetic fields are therefore sent towards the Earth at great speed. Solar storms occur along with a huge explosion on the Sun.

Credit: Pixabay.com, Roman Grac
Credit: Pixabay.com, Roman Grac

Life wouldn’t be possible on Earth without sunlight. First of all, the Sun nurtures plants enough to produce oxygen, which is a crucial substance for life. As a wise man once said: “they say you cannot live without love, but I think oxygen is more important”. But it’s interesting to see that even the Sun itself has a dark side and can even kill you if you get too close. Space travel is crucial, but perhaps everyone is already well aware that it would be a terrible idea to have the Sun as one of the destinations.

There’s no use expecting the Sun to run out of fuel anytime soon, as our star accounts for 99.86% of the entire mass of the solar system. The Sun will burn up all the hydrogen that converts into helium only after about 5 billion years. And we hate to disappoint you, but none of us will be around by that time.


SHARE
Cristian Antonescu

Even since he was a child, Cristian was staring curiously at the stars, wondering about the Universe and our place in it. Today he's seeing his dream come true by writing about the latest news in astronomy. Cristian is also glad to be covering health and other science topics, having significant experience in writing about such fields.

Share this post

Post Comment

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.