Obtaining Regular Matter From Dark Matter? Gravity Portals Could Make It Possible

Obtaining Regular Matter From Dark Matter? Gravity Portals Could Make It Possible
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For decades, astrophysicists had been struggling to understand the nature of dark matter – the ‘glue’ that binds stars and galaxies, as well as the mysterious force causing the unexplainable motion of galaxies. Dark matter is much more prevalent throughout the Universe than the normal matter that we interact with daily.

Dark matter makes up about 27% of the Universe, dark energy accounts for 68%, while the rest is represented by the normal matter made of atoms and molecules (around 5%). But wouldn’t it be great to have a mysterious ‘magic wand’ at our disposal that could transform dark matter into regular matter? An article from LiveScience.com suggests just that.

Gravity portals could solve two huge scientific conundrums

The Milky Way is spewing massive amounts of super high-energy radiation, and nobody knows exactly why. Also, nobody knows what dark matter is made of. But the good news is that the concept of gravity portals could solve both dilemmas. As soon as two particles of dark matter are attracted into such a portal, they annihilate each other and generate huge amounts of energy in the form of gamma rays.

As wild as the new idea may sound, it can also explain why the galactic center is so crowded with gamma rays. Furthermore, the theory could explain how dark matter could sometimes interact with normal matter. Chance gravitational interactions (aka ‘gravity portals’) could be enough to make the dark matter particles occasionally obliterate each other. The reason they are called ‘gravity portals’ is because the chance interactions offer a possibility for particles to interact only due to gravity. In the end, it’s all just a theory, but who knows what the Universe’s majesty could unfold to us someday.

Feel free to read the source article explaining gravity portals on Live Science. The study regarding the wild hypothesis was published to the preprint database arXiv.


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