New Discovery Suggests That the Universe is a Far More Dangerous Place Than Anyone Could Ever Imagine

New Discovery Suggests That the Universe is a Far More Dangerous Place Than Anyone Could Ever Imagine
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Probably everyone knows by now that the Universe is far from being the friendly place as we perceive it as long as we keep our feet on the ground. Once we exit our planet’s atmosphere, the Universe will do its best to try to kill us. It has so many ways: lack of oxygen and atmospheric pressure, cosmic radiation, lack of liquid water, extreme temperatures, and so on.

How about for the “real deal” of cosmic destruction? We’re talking about black holes, quasars, supernovae, and more. These space beasts will destroy anything that gets too close.

Dust has made it impossible to see multiple supernovae

According to Universe Today, an international team of researchers had been using data gathered by the Spitzer telescope to come to a staggering conclusion. They found that interstellar dust in galaxies is capable of obscuring supernovae, which are tremendously powerful explosions in the Universe. That type of dust is to blame, which consists of particles that can grant the same effect as smoke.

Credit: Pixabay.com, eli007
Credit: Pixabay.com, eli007

According to existing theoretical models, there are about twice the amount of supernovae that were observed in the wider universe. The number of supernovae observed within the farther parts of the universe was overestimated. While scientists simply assumed that the missing supernovae did exist, they weren’t captured in the visible light spectrum.

The intergalactic dust will penetrate into many galaxies, especially the ones that are farther and younger than our Milky Way galaxy. The farther away and younger a galaxy will be, the more likely it is for dust to obscure its supernovae.

Therefore, the Universe is a much more dangerous place than you can imagine, and there’s nothing at this point that we can do about it. A supernova can be as large as an entire galaxy.

Let’s just be thankful that Earth is not in the trajectory of any known supernova, as far as astronomers know.


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Cristian Antonescu

Even since he was a child, Cristian was staring curiously at the stars, wondering about the Universe and our place in it. Today he's seeing his dream come true by writing about the latest news in astronomy. Cristian is also glad to be covering health and other science topics, having significant experience in writing about such fields.

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