NASA’s WFIRST Passes All The Essential Tests

NASA’s WFIRST Passes All The Essential Tests
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The end of the universe is a fascinating topic in the scientific community, but we have to learn what happened until now before we attempt to explore terminus theories. NASA’s upcoming Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope (also known as WFIRST) will explore the distant cosmos in an attempt to gather more information. The Wide Field Instrument is the main instrument of the telescope and an essential component of the mission.

The WFI passed its preliminary design review, which is an important achievement for the mission since it means that the instrument met the design, budget, and schedule requirements without issue. The project will advance to the next stage of development as NASA will start to design and manufacture the flight hardware.

The preliminary design review plays a vital role in the mission because it evaluates the ideas developed by engineers and runs them to a series of test to verify that they will work as expected.

NASA’s WFIRST passes all the essential tests

NASA’s WFIRST can also offer valuable feedback, which plays an important role in deciding what needs to be changed before the mission can advance. The engineers will use the results of the review in the creation of the next design iteration as they prepare the instrument for a harsher test.

NASA’s WFIRST will be a bleeding edge space telescope with the ability to explore the infrared universe from its position in the orbit of the moon. The device will rely on two instruments, the WFI, and a coronograph. The WFI camera sports the same angular resolution as Hubble, but the field of view is considerably larger. The data collected by the telescope will allow researchers to find new and fascinating information about stars and planetary systems.

By mapping the structure and distribution of the matter in the cosmos, the researchers may also discover the fate of the universe. Since the field of view is 100 times larger than the one offered by Hubble, NASA’s WFIRST will collect data at a faster rate, increasing the speed at which research is done.


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