NASA Reveals How It Sounds Like to Drive on Mars (Literally Speaking)

NASA Reveals How It Sounds Like to Drive on Mars (Literally Speaking)
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NASA’s Perseverance rover arrived on the Jezero Crater from Mars in mid-February, and it already brought back exciting data. The final goal is to look for signs of microbial life, but as it usually goes in astronomy, unexpected situations will occur.

FoxNews.com reveals that NASA recently published its first recordings of a vehicle driving on Mars. Of course, we’re talking about the Mars Perseverance rover, and you can listen to it below:

NASA’s rover arrived on the Red Planet after a long journey of about six months. The liftoff took place on July 30, and the rover carried a very sophisticated set of tools.

Lead engineer Dave Grue of the Mars 2020 EDL camera and microphone subsystem declared:

If I heard these sounds driving my car, I’d pull over and call for a tow.

Grue added:

But if you take a minute to consider what you’re hearing and where it was recorded, it makes perfect sense.

Our website has recently written about the Perseverance rover encountering a dust devil forming on Mars, and the images amazed people. Dust devils are whirlwinds that can form on both our planet and Mars, and they aren’t too lasting. Dust devils range from small (up to a few meters tall) to large (over one kilometre tall). We shouldn’t mistake dust devils for tornadoes, as the latter ones are much more imposing.

NASA announced its Mars 2020 mission (which includes the Perseverance rover) since December 2012 during the American Geophysical Union’s fall meeting from San Francisco. Mars 2020 also includes the helicopter drone known as Ingenuity.

The Red Planet doesn’t show signs of hosting any life forms in the present, but things could have been a lot different long ago. Until about 3.7 billion years ago, Mars was covered in rivers and seas in a similar way as Earth. The presence of liquid water is one of the strongest indicators of a planet being habitable.


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Cristian Antonescu

Even since he was a child, Cristian was staring curiously at the stars, wondering about the Universe and our place in it. Today he's seeing his dream come true by writing about the latest news in astronomy. Cristian is also glad to be covering health and other science topics, having significant experience in writing about such fields.

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