NASA Has Shared A New Stunning Crab Nebula Image

NASA Has Shared A New Stunning Crab Nebula Image
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NASA has recently shared a stunning photo depicting the Crab Nebula. The image, however, has been recreated from three different photos taken by the Hubble Space Telescope, Spitzer telescope, and Chandra X-ray Observatory.

The new Crab Nebula image has been produced by mixing the blue and white image captured by the Chandra X-ray upon which, the NASA team added the purple hues of the Crab Nebula captured by the Hubble Space Telescope and pinkish colors from the image of the Crab Nebula taken by the Spitzer Space Telescope.

The Crab Nebula, according to NASA, is among the first space objects analyzed and spied by the Chandra X-ray Observatory 20 years ago when NASA launched this observatory.

The Crab Nebula was a very interesting space object for NASA to study during the last 20 years

The NASA’s interest in the Crab Nebula space object has been explained several times by the NASA’s astronomers. Accordingly, the Crab Nebula represents a rare experience for the astronomers which have been able to study and record data showing when and how a star explosion occurred.

The Crab Nebula has been discovered since 1050 AD and has always been a topic of many discussions, theories, and studies during the last several hundreds of years.

Nowadays, however, the astronomers of the world gathered a whole bunch of data about the Crab Nebula.

According to the observations, the Crab Nebula holds a pulsar (a neutron star that’s spinning at high speed and is extremely magnetized) which has once been a very big star that eventually collapsed.

According to NASA, the Crab Nebula’s fast-swirling core produces “intense electromagnetic field that creates jets of matter and anti-matter moving away from both the north and south poles of the pulsar, and an intense wind flowing out in the equatorial direction”.

NASA has shared the new stunning Crab Nebula image to celebrate 20 years of studying this extraordinary space object.


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