NASA and ESA Pay Volunteers To Stay In Bed For 60 Days

NASA and ESA Pay Volunteers To Stay In Bed For 60 Days
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No matter the way you see the dream job for you, you must admit that you would prefer getting paid to lounge around in bed for 60 days. For this activity, NASA and ESA want a crew of volunteers so the potential benefits of artificial gravity can be tested on them. It might prove a useful trial for long-haul space missions.

The research is conducted in Germany, and it lasts two full months during which 24 participants must remain in bed. For blood flow to be reduced to the extremities, the volunteers will be seated at a slight incline so that their legs are slightly higher than their heads, muscle deterioration thus being caused.

The muscles of astronauts are affected depending on the period of time they spend in space. For example, Scientists who fly to the International Space Station, in order to keep their bodies how they should be, they have to exercise regularly with resistance machines, but NASA and ESA want to know if another benefit can be drawn from occasional upkeep with artificial gravity.

NASA and ESA pay around $19,000 to volunteers to stay in bed for 60 days

The volunteers, two dozen of them, were tested in two groups of 12 and each one would take occasional trips to a centrifuge in the laboratory, but otherwise, rest in bed for 60 days. Blood will be pushed back towards the feet of the participant thanks to the spinning arm of the centrifuge, this way the effects of gravity being stimulated. The scientists hope to reveal if there are any benefits that can be provided by such a system for real-life astronauts during lengthy stays in space.

Every participant in this experiment receives a handsome sum of 16,500 euros (nearly $19,000) while all they need to do it to lay in bed reading, playing video games or watching movies and TV.


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