Massive Asteroid Has 1 in 7,000 Chances To Impact Earth in September, But You Shouldn’t Worry About It

Massive Asteroid Has 1 in 7,000 Chances To Impact Earth in September, But You Shouldn’t Worry About It
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A massive asteroid as big as a football field, known as 2006QV89, might hit our planet in September this year. However, you shouldn’t worry about it since this giant space rock has only one in 7,000 chances to impact Earth this fall. While, many other news reports talked about this event as a dangerous one, accentuating the significance of the flyby of the 2006QV89 massive asteroid, in reality, this space rock is a Near-Earth Object (NEO), some types of asteroids located near our planet but which are strictly tracked down by space agencies.

Scientists are still working on identifying every Near-Earth Object. The so-called 2006QV89 is only the latest one spotted by astronomers, and the ESA (the European Space Agency) introduced it as a risky NEO. According to that, many started believing that this massive asteroid is indeed dangerous to life on Earth as it might actually impact Earth when the space rock flies next to our planet in September this year.

You Shouldn’t Worry About The Massive Asteroid Which Would Whizz Next To Earth In September

Well, there are lots of space rocks, that are usually some of the Near-Earth Objects, as the space agencies dubbed them, which frequently fly next to Earth. The thing about 2006QV89 is that this massive asteroid poses one in 7,000 chances to impact Earth as it whizzes next to our planet in September this year. However, those probabilities mean no threat to life on Earth. Accordingly, you shouldn’t worry about the 2006QV89 massive asteroid.

The fact that this massive asteroid would have one in 7,000 chances to hit our planet means nothing for the space agencies, so there is no reason for them to take measures against this space rock. Even though we know that ESA’s Risk List sounds like the Doomsday, the so-called NASA and ESA Priority List is the real deal. Accordingly, a massive asteroid listed on the Priority List should genuinely worry us. However, those space rocks are frequently under surveillance, as ScienceAlert reported.


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