It’s Official! We’re Living In The Meghalayan, A New Geological Age

It’s Official! We’re Living In The Meghalayan, A New Geological Age
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It’s now official! We’re living a new geological age called the Meghalayan, a new era characterized by the super-drought that happened about 4,200 years ago and which caused human migrations in Egypt, Greece, Syria, Palestine, Mesopotamia, the Indus Valley, and the Yangtze River Valley.

The new era has been added this week in the International Geologic Time Scale which divides the Earth’s history into eons, eras, periods, epochs and ages, and in a similar manner, we divide small increments of time into years, months, hours, and so on.

The scientists added three new ages to divide the current Holocene epoch we live in. Accordingly, they added Greenlandian (Early Holocene) Age, characterized by the brief warming of 11,700 years ago, Northgrippian (Middle Holocene) Age, starting 8,300 years ago, and the before-mentioned Meghalayan (Late Holocene) Age, which began with the super-drought of 4,200 years ago.

The Meghalayan new geological age is characterized by a global climatic event and human migrations

As reported by the International Commission on Stratigraphy, which, under the guidance of the Union of Geological Sciences, is responsible for standardizing the International Geologic Time Scale, the new geological age is characterized by a global climatic event, civilizations collapse, and the human migrations in Egypt, Greece, Syria, Palestine, Mesopotamia, the Indus Valley, and the Yangtze River Valley.

“But it is curious that round about 4,200 years ago, just at the time when we’ve identified a significantly drier phase … we do find indications of societal collapse which could – and I say could – reflect aridification was driving that collapse,” said Mike Walker, Emeritus Professor at the Wales University, and the leader of the team which worked to add the Meghalayan new geological age.

The new geological age is named after a stalagmite found in the Mawmluh Cave, situated in the northeast Indian state of Meghalaya, which is the geological standard the scientists used to mark the exact start of the Meghalayan age.


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