Huge Meteorite Splashed Into The Pacific Ocean And NASA Plans To Retrieve That Space Rock – Watch Live!

Huge Meteorite Splashed Into The Pacific Ocean And NASA Plans To Retrieve That Space Rock – Watch Live!
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On March 7th, 2018, the residents of Ocean Shores, Washington, witnessed a big flash of light and heard a powerful explosion-like sound. It was a huge meteorite that splashed into the Pacific Ocean. Now, about four months later, NASA plans to retrieve that space rock and study it.

The meteorite, most likely, split into smaller pieces after colliding with the water, but NASA wants to gather as many pieces as possible to examine these rocks coming from another world. And, luckily, a local team of researchers offered their help, as well as their boat equipped with high-end technologies, the Nautilus.

The Nautilus is a very sophisticated research boat owned by the Ocean Exploration Trust (OET), a nonprofit organization operated by Robert Ballard. The OET, accompanied by the NASA’s scientists and the researchers from the Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary and the University of Washington, will use Nautilus’ remote-operated submarines to search the seabed for any piece of the huge meteorite that splashed there in March.

Why is this huge meteorite that splashed in the Pacific Ocean so significant for NASA?

According to the specialists, the massive meteorite fragmented over an area that’s 400-ft deep and quite flat, so it would be straightforward to locate and retrieve almost all the black meteorite pieces.

Also noteworthy is that every piece found becomes the property of the research department of the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, DC.

NASA is also involved in this because meteorites are unique space rocks that can “tell’ a lot of information of their origins. Thus, it would be an excellent opportunity for the scientists to examine a giant meteorite that splashed into the ocean only four months ago.

The whole event will be available on nautiluslive.org where everyone interested can watch live. Also, the recovery of the huge meteorite that splashed in the Pacific Ocean on March 7th is available below.


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