Hubble Space Telescope Revealed That Milky Way Galaxy Burst With Stars Due To Collision With Another Galaxy

Hubble Space Telescope Revealed That Milky Way Galaxy Burst With Stars Due To Collision With Another Galaxy
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NASA and ESA’s Hubble Space Telescope has yet again provided scientists with significant data. An image captured by the space telescope depicts the peculiar galaxy NGC 4485, showing signs of a collision. The impact looks like a hit-and-run accident with a galaxy that passed nearby. Instead of wrecking the galaxy, the impact is now birthing a new generation of stars, and probably planets as well.

The image captured by Hubble shows that a part of the galaxy is burning with star arrays, among the abundance of young stars of the color blue and still forming pink nebulas. The other side, the left part of the galaxy, looks untouched. It suggests clues of the galaxy’s earlier coiled structure, which was being subjected to normal galactic development in the past.

The wider galaxy NGC 4490, also the culprit, is now on the lower part of the frame. The galaxies collided with each other a few million years ago and now about 24,000 light-years split them.

Hubble Space Telescope Revealed That Milky Way Galaxy Burst With Stars Due To Collision With Another Galaxy

The gravitational rivalry produced wavering grounds of gas of higher mass and dust all over the star systems, this movement causing a burst of star arrangement. The NGC 4485 is a good instance of the type of cosmic collision which was a lot more usual billions of years back at the time when the universe was a lot smaller, and galaxies were placed more close to each other.

The galaxy NGC 4485 dwells in the northern constellation Canes Venatici, at a distance of 25 million light-years from the Earth. The image provided by telescope’s Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3), offers a closer look into the intricacies of galaxy development.

The Hubble Space Telescope is an international project signed by NASA and ESA (European Space Agency), and it is maintained and controlled by NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Maryland. The Hubble’s scientific tasks are led by the Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI) in Baltimore, Maryland.


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