Globular Clusters Are 4 Billion Years Younger, According To Recent Binary Stars Study, And Shed New Light On Galactic Formation

Globular Clusters Are 4 Billion Years Younger, According To Recent Binary Stars Study, And Shed New Light On Galactic Formation
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The globular clusters might be up to 4 billion years younger than earlier anticipated, according to a new study carried out by the researchers from the University of Warwick, reported by ScienceDaily. The new discovery, which has been made by employing the new Binary Population and Spectral Synthesis (BPASS) models to examine binary stars evolution, might as well change the classical theory of galactic formation.

Made up of hundreds of thousands of tightly clustered stars, the globular clusters were supposed to be nearly as old as the Universe itself, but as a result of the new scientific models, it has been proven that these clusters would be as young as 9 billion years, thus 4 billion years younger than the prior estimates indicated.

Accordingly, the classical theory of galactic formation might be proved to present some shortcomings as it has been based on the previous estimates that globular clusters are almost as old as the Universe.

Binary Population and Spectral Synthesis (BPASS) models shed new light on binary stars evolution within globular clusters and galactic formation

The new Binary Population and Spectral Synthesis (BPASS) models are designed to consider the particulars of the development of the binary stars inside the globular clusters and are intended to examine the light colors of ancient binary stars concentrations and their chemical composition found in their spectra.

By employing the BPASS models and computing the age of the binary stars systems, the scientists were finally successful in proving that the globular clusters englobing these binary systems have formed earlier than previous studies estimated.

“Determining ages for stars has always depended on comparing observations to the models which encapsulate our understanding of how stars form and evolve,” said Elizabeth Stanway from the University of Warwick, who also added that astronomers are more and more aware of “the interactions between stars and their binary and tertiary companions” within globular clusters.

Also, Stanway evokes that these new findings opened new roads to understanding how galactic formation happened for real.


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