Event Horizon Telescope Snapped Jets From A Supermassive Black Hole

Event Horizon Telescope Snapped Jets From A Supermassive Black Hole
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A team of researchers harnessed the Event Horizon Telescope. It aimed it at a supermassive black hole, capturing impressive images of high-power energy shorts that were released by the object. The images were recorded after observing the M87 galaxy, which is located five billion years away from Earth.

Such massive plasma jets are a part of blazars, which form from supermassive black holes. The supermassive black holes spin at high speed, generating powerful magnetic winds and exciting the materials which can be found floating around the black hole.

A significant amount of the material found around a black hole will traverse the event horizon and vanish. Still, in rare cases, some of it will be launched in the form of jets that gather speed across the magnetic lines which surround the black hole.

Images of jets from a supermassive black hole via the Event Horizon Telescope

The high-resolution images will offer the opportunity to learn more about these jets, especially the mechanics which contribute to their formation and the acceleration that takes them beyond the black hole and barreling across the void.

Researchers have already observed that jets seem to feature an unusual tilt at the base, which may be influenced by the presence of extra material that spins around the jet. It is also theorized that blobs of material could be a part of the disk of gas and dust that fuels the black hole.

Due to the distance at which the black hole is located, such jets tend to be observed rarely. However, the direction followed is close towards our planets, which means that its radiation intensity is boosted, to traits that make it stand out as it travels.

A connection between jets, supermassive black holes, and accretion disks seems likely at this point, and it could serve as an essential research topic in the future. Many questions related to black holes continue to puzzle the scientific community.


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