China Works on a Powerful Telescope to Explore Distant Galaxies Soon

China Works on a Powerful Telescope to Explore Distant Galaxies Soon
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If you thought that Earth already has enough powerful telescopes, astronomers from China seem to disagree. That’s perhaps why they’re preparing to deploy a new telescope into space to take a better look at distant galaxies and also help the world learn more about dark matter and dark energy.

The telescope in question is the Chinese Space Station Telescope (CSST) or simply Xuntian, and it will be launched in late 2023, according to space.com. The future gear can be considered a worthy opponent to the much older Hubble Space Telescope that’s shooting photos into deep space since 1990.

Xuntian has a field of view that’s hundreds of times bigger than that of Hubble’s

CSST will have a field of view that shall be 350 times higher than the one of the mighty Hubble. The future telescope will also boast a lens that measures 6.6-feet in diameter.

Chinese astronomers seem very confident about the new project. Li Ran, who’s a project scientist at the CSST Scientific Data Reduction System, explained in a statement:

The telescope can bring China’s research in optical astronomy to the forefront of the world and help cultivate world-class Chinese scientists,

It can also take breathtaking visible pictures, allowing the public to directly feel and understand the universe.

Dark matter and dark energy are currently two of the most mysterious notions about our Cosmos. Dark energy, for instance, is the driving force behind the acceleration of the Universe’s expansion. Our Cosmos has been undergoing a constant expansion since the Big Bang, and without dark energy, there was the danger for everything, including galaxies, stars, and planets, to collapse all the way back into the singularity where they came from. But still, there is a lot more to learn about dark energy and how it works!

Dark matter, on the other hand, also plays a crucial role in the Cosmos. It binds entire galaxies together, and it is thought to have been involved tremendously in the development of stars, galaxies, and even planets.

 

 


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Cristian Antonescu

Even since he was a child, Cristian was staring curiously at the stars, wondering about the Universe and our place in it. Today he's seeing his dream come true by writing about the latest news in astronomy. Cristian is also glad to be covering health and other science topics, having significant experience in writing about such fields.

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