Burial Chamber in Saqqara And the Snake Goddess – Archaeologists Uncovered Secrets on Mummification

Burial Chamber in Saqqara And the Snake Goddess – Archaeologists Uncovered Secrets on Mummification
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A series of thrilling discoveries have been analyzed at the Mummification Workshop Complex in Saqqara. A team of researchers has analyzed a hidden burial chamber to determine that the dead bodies buried inside were a couple of priests and priestess that were working for a snake goddess, commonly referred to as Niut-shaes. The analysis was conducted with the help of archeologists from the University of Tubingen in Germany and was made public by the Egyptian Ministers.

This study is even more important since it brings new insight into the mummification packages that embalmers used to offer to their customers. The new burial chamber dates back from the 26th Dynasty living in Saqqara, and its surface is more than 100 feet, protecting 54 mummies and skeletons, as well as five sarcophagi that hold organs of the deceased.

Scientists found a burial chamber in Saqqara and more secrets about mummification

The chamber was positioned behind a stone wall dating back from 2,600 years ago, where the bodies were deposited in four wooden coffins. The Egyptian tradition states that the deceased is buried after the lungs, intestines, stomach, and liver have been embalmed and stored in four separate jars that will forever be protected by the Four Sours of Horus. This discovery is even more exciting since the archaeologists have managed to determine that one of the bodies, a priestess called Didibastett, was buried with six canopic jars, contradicting the commonly believed theory.

Therefore, the researchers have analyzed the interior of the six jars, using the help of computerized tomography and discovered that all of them containing human tissue. However, it is still not clear, which are the extra organs that have been buried in the coffin and why did the embalmer offer a specialized package to Didibastet. The mission of the archeologists’ team is scheduled to end at the end of this year, responding to all the unanswered questions.


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