Breakthrough In Quantum Science: Unique Microscope Records The Flow Of Light

Breakthrough In Quantum Science: Unique Microscope Records The Flow Of Light
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Technion Professor Ido Kaminer and his team of experts reveal a massive breakthrough in the field of quantum science. They unveiled a quantum microscope that records the flow of light and enables direct observation of light that’s trapped inside a photonic crystal.

Their research is called “Coherent Interaction Between Free Electrons and a Photonic Cavity,” and it was published in Nature.

All the experiments have been performed using a unique ultrafast transmission electron microscope at the Technion-Israel Institute of Technology.

The most versatile device 

It’s extremely important to note that this microscope is the latest and most versatile of more such devices that exist in the scientific world.

“We have developed an electron microscope that produces, what is in many respects, the best near- field optical microscopy in the world. Using our microscope, we can change the color and angle of light that illuminates any sample of nano materials and map their interactions with electrons, as we demonstrated with photonic crystals,” explained Prof. Kaminer.

He continued and said, “This is the first time we can actually see the dynamics of light while it is trapped in nano materials, rather than relying on computer simulations.”

It’s been revealed that this will have a massive impact once experts will investigate more advanced nano/quantum materials. 

Experts start exploring the new stages 

“We have an extremely high-resolution microscope and we are starting to explore the next stages,” Prof. Kaminer stated. 

The expert revealed that the most advanced screens in the world today are using QLED technology based on quantum dots, and this makes it possible to control color contrast at a higher definition.

The challenge is the way in which the quality of the tiny quantum dots on large surfaces and make then more uniform. This will boost the screen resolution and the color contrast more than the current technologies are allowing these days. 

Check out more details in the video above and in the original article of Phys.org


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