Air Pollution Boosts Risks Of Depression And Anxiety

Air Pollution Boosts Risks Of Depression And Anxiety
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Mental health is very significant, just like the other medical categories are. It is good to understand how unwell people who suffer from depression, for example, or bipolar disorder, are. They matter as much as everyone else, and we must protect them as much as we can. Recent studies though, show something really upsetting and unsettling – air pollution boosts risks of depression and anxiety.

Is hard to take everything serious these days, or to understand their meaning entirely. It seems that everything could affect us nowadays, and all is just the worst. Recent studies show us the exact thing and how dangerous the air  is.

It is believed that every exposure in the atmosphere could affect us more than we thought. It’s not just oxygen anymore, and the things are really alarming. We inhale apparently something that appears to be more like sulfur dioxide, ozone, each of them which is very dangerous to our heart and lungs.  

Air Pollution Boosts Risks Of Depression And Anxiety

New studies show how the inhaling of polluted air is actually beyond the respiratory and cardiac systems. This dirty air quality is also troubling our brains, resulting in some big problems for our mental health, like schizophrenia, depression, and even bipolar disorder. If you or someone you know is struggling with these, or other mental health issues, BetterHelp is a great option.

Scientists took into consideration countries like Denmark, for example, or the US, and analyze their atmosphere precisely. They stated that the Denmark results were very concerning, just like in the US, existing a correlation between them.

For personality disorder, the association was toughest, with people breathing the worst air quality, reaching 162 %. 148 % for schizophrenia and 50 % for others, as well. Scientists, however, thought at many possibilities why people’s brain could be exposed to pollutants. They analyzed the direct inhalation, which starts right from the nose and then goes directly to the brain. And the indirect exposure, too, at that moment when the pollutants arrive in the lungs.


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