Study: Pregnant Women with Covid-19 May Give Birth Prematurely

Study: Pregnant Women with Covid-19 May Give Birth Prematurely
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Many studies have involved the infection with the new SARS-CoV-2 virus and its effects on human bodies. A recent study discovered that women infected with the Covid-19 virus while pregnant were 60% more likely to give birth prematurely. A birth is considered preterm if it happens before 37 weeks into pregnancy. 

More on the California cohort-study

Researchers at the University of California conducted the research and studied the association of the Covid-19 infection with preterm birth. The cohort study involved early-term birth with research subjects belonging to different races and ethnic diversities. Several factors the investigations took into account have been the gestational age and the pre–existing medical conditions of the pregnant women, such as obesity, diabetes and more. 

Findings and outcome

After using several statistics to determine the presumed association between Covid-19 infections and preterm labour, researchers concluded that all pregnant women from all races and ethnic groups studied infected with the coronavirus during pregnancy have had a higher risk of premature labour. The risk was even higher for pregnant women with comorbidities. The study concludes that pregnant women need to get vaccinated against the SARS-CoV-2 virus to avoid complications such as giving birth prematurely. 

Which ethnic groups are more affected by the virus?

According to the statistics, pregnant women belonging to the American Indian and Alaska native had the highest premature birth rate if infected with the virus during pregnancy, 12.9%. The following ethnic group is Native Hawaiian with 11.4% and then Latinx with 10.3%. The study gathered information from more than 9,000 women who tested positive during pregnancy, and it remains unknown why this happens. Premature birth can negatively affect the baby, and they might need special medical care and spend more time in the hospital. After birht, a premature baby needs special care and it might leed to long term health problems.

 


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Asheley Rice

I am a pop culture and social media expert. Aside from writing about the latest news health, I also enjoy pop culture and Yoga. I have BA in American Cultural Studies and currently enrolled in a Mass-Media MA program. I like to spend my spring breaks volunteering overseas.

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