Strange Iceberg Spotted by NASA

Strange Iceberg Spotted by NASA
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Images of a strangely-shaped iceberg were captured by NASA, as the bizarre iceberg was approaching the Larsen C ice shelf, on the eastern cost of the Antarctic Peninsula.

The spectacular photo was captured during an aerial survey of the polar ice, which is part of a project known as the IceBridge flight. Its flat form and sharp angles are a clear hint that it appeared during a recent calving event. Researchers believe that the so-called ‘’tabular iceberg ‘’ may have split from the Larsen C ice shelf.

The strange form is easy to explain as there are two types of icebergs. The first type is known by everyone, as it is the traditional iceberg often seen in movies, in the form of prism near the surface. Those icebergs are particularly dangerous as they are quite large under the surface, posing a serious threat to passing ships or submarines.

The tabular icebergs can be envisioned metaphorically as long nails. When they grow too large, they split from the base, which explains the sharp edges. The iceberg is notable since previous ones were particularly smaller

As the global temperature is on the rise, the ice around the world continues to melt at an accelerated speed. One of threatened ice shelf is Larsen C, which is currently under observation as researchers believe that it will soon begin to disintegrate. Signs are already present, as a massive iceberg catalogued as A-68 broke away last year, hinting that the Larsen C will have the same fate as the Larsen A and B.

While A-68 has been floating harmlessly around the Weddell Sea since it started floating, a recent study showed that it’s on its way back to Antarctica as it started to rotate with an incredible momentum. The iceberg is on a collision course with the Larsen-C ice shelf and an impact is more than possible since a course deviation is very unlikely.


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