Slowly, but Steadily, Venus Is Disappearing

Slowly, but Steadily, Venus Is Disappearing
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This month brings a steady movement of the evening star, which will eventually result in its disappearance from the night sky. Besides the Sun and the Moon, Venus is the third brightest outer space object. However, its impressive appearance will face a couple of changes throughout the upcoming days. Venus, commonly referred to as the evening star, has reached its brightest point last month. However, at the end of May, it will no longer be present on the night sky.

The upcoming two weeks are crucial since Venus will change its current position. Therefore, at the end of the month, the evening star location will be between our planet and the Sun. One of the most efficient ways of seeing Venus is by utilizing a telescope. Fortunately, sky-watchers still have a couple of days to watch the impressive light spectacle on the night sky created by the marvelous Venus until its disappearance. We will not be able to see its bright light as the planet moves across our planet.

This month has brought a steady increase in its apparent diameter size. It is currently ranked at 49 arcseconds and will diminish by 90% at the end of this month. This phenomenon can easily be observed while using a telescope. Unfortunately for those that do not have this special equipment, it is impossible to admire Venus’ last bright days.

Venus’ future movement pattern will make the planet reach the inferior conjunction of the Sun. On the 3rd of June, the upcoming inferior conjunction is scheduled to take part. At that moment, the evening star will reach half of the Sun’s center, meaning that the planet will be located at only one-quarter of the degree for our star’s northern extremity. Therefore, Venus’ position will make this planet too close to be observed without damage.


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