See How Yucatan’s Ancient Climate Reveals Key Data About Present Global Climate

See How Yucatan’s Ancient Climate Reveals Key Data About Present Global Climate
SHARE

Recent work in the scientific field reveals some intriguing changes in hurricane and tides activity had a role in upending the Maya civilization centuries ago.

Practically, changes to the water throughout the famous Yucatan peninsula affected the Maya and now unveils key details on the current climate change.

Here is what you need to know.

What Does the Future Hold?

A team of researchers came across some intriguing stuff about the Maya population and the current global climate.

Apparently, a few fluctuations and settlement patterns in the Maya population were triggered by the access to freshwater. Quite intriguing, right? Well, that’s not all.

Way before the Europeans arose and the Maya civilisation’s death happened, the archaeological record reveals cycles of internal disruption.

According to previous research, significant areas of the Yucatan Peninsula lie on rock formations made of limestone, filled with caves and fissures. The rainwater and runoff accumulate in those openings and underground rivers.

The most intriguing part is that much of the freshwater is on the Yucatan in those underground parts.

Aaron Coutino, a recent PhD graduate in applied mathematics at the University of Waterloo, released a statement:

“If you have changes in sea level or tidal activity, then what happens in those fissure zones is a mixing between the frershwater on the surface and the salty water that intrudes from the ocean underneath.”

Maya civilization vs the world now

Researchers needed to perform a series of tests to come across the recent discovery.

They placed some sensors in water all over Yucatan to collect data. Then, they found how fluctuations of water kick in daily, along with salination, unveiling how ocean tides impact event far-inland bodies of water.

The new data offers some much-needed insights for climate historians and archaeologists, and present-day climatologists, too. It also helps us make better predictions of future climate change and figure out more key data about the current global climate.


SHARE
Georgia Nica

Writing was, and still is, my first passion. I love games, mobile gadgets, and all that cool stuff about technology and science. I’ll try my best to bring you the best news every day.

Share this post

Post Comment

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.