Revolutionary Test Now Available for Predicting Autism on Pregnant Women

Revolutionary Test Now Available for Predicting Autism on Pregnant Women
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There is a recent study which shows that if a woman experienced with having a child with autism specter disorder (ASD) in the past, then she has a higher risk of having a second child with ASD than other people. Researchers from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute developed a number of studies recently which have made enormous steps towards predicting and diagnosing ASD.

According to estimates, if a mother previously had a child with ASD, then she has a risk of approximately 18.7 percent of having a second child diagnosed with ASD. On the other hand, the risk of ASD for the world’s general population is approximately 1.7 percent. Hahn, a researcher that worked on these studies believes that “it would be highly desirable if a prediction based upon physiological measurements could be made to determine which risk group a prospective mother falls into”.

That’s exactly why researched put serious work into developing a physiological test which would be able to predict the risk for autism. The test places a higher emphasis on neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s. The study shows that, after measuring the metabolites of the folate-dependent transmethylation and transsulfuration biochemical pathways, it was possible to find out if the pregnant mother’s metabolic profile could determine if she would have a child with autism.

Those that gave birth to children with autism were separated into two groups, based on their kids’ diagnosis, and then they were compared with a group of control mothers who never had a child with autism. The results showed that, while it is currently impossible to diagnose a child with ASD by age 3, they can still help scientists figure out the relative risk for having a child with ASD. This happens after measuring the plasma metabolites as they indicate the 18.7 percent vs. 1.7 percent scenario.


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