Niagara Region Reports Increase Of Lyme Disease-Carrying Ticks

Niagara Region Reports Increase Of Lyme Disease-Carrying Ticks
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Health officials had to advise the public to enjoy the outdoors with more caution as a rise in ticks has been reported this year in the Niagara Region. Most of the spider-like bugs reported have been black-legged ticks which can infect with Lyme disease. At risk are also the regions of Halton and Hamilton.

Niagara Public Health representatives say that almost four times more bugs have been seen this year, compared to the same time frame in the prior year. Residents have been plucked out a number of 85 of ticks, and 80 of them were black-legged, the kind that can transmit Lyme disease.

The health officials say that when the weather is cold and a bit wet, the bugs usually thrive, and because they have the tendency to dry out, they can be found under leaf litter.

Niagara Region Reports Increase Of Lyme Disease-Carrying Ticks

Another aspect that could add to the higher tick reports this year is that people are becoming more aware and vigilant, Niagara Public Health said. Signs warn of ticks at Rotary Park in St. Catharines, and almost all Niagara Region is considered a higher risk for the bugs by Ontario Public Health. These kind of bugs like tall grass and are mostly hiding under leaves.

If a tick carrying the disease is deep-in-the skin for longer than 24 hours, the risk of being infected with the disease grows. The condition is infectious that in the early phases can cause fever, fatigue, and headaches. You can notice it by a bullseye rush the tick leaves behind. To pull them off, one should use tweezers ensuring that no part of the bug is left behind.

Even so, not all the black-legged ticks carry the Lyme disease. Public Health Officials say that out of the 91 black-legged ticks reported last year in Hamilton, only 5 of them tested positive for Lyme disease. There is an increase of these bugs in the Halton region as well. 48 black-legged insects were collected in 2018, all year, and so far, 62 ticks have been collected this spring already.


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