New Study Reveals that Monkeys Develop Immunity to COVID-19

New Study Reveals that Monkeys Develop Immunity to COVID-19
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COVID-19 is currently the most feared disease on the planet, and researchers keep trying to find new ways to fight it. One of the main questions regarding the virus is if formerly infected patients can develop immunity for it or not. One recent study may hold the big answer.

Researchers just infected nine monkeys with COVID-19, the illness caused by the new coronavirus. The animals recovered, but the team tried to infect them again. Surprisingly or not, the monkeys didn’t get sick again.

Is the study conclusive enough?

Surely, the question that now lies in everyone’s head is that the outcome of the study means that humans can also develop immunity to COVID-19. The truth is that the study is NOT conclusive in the case of humans – there’s no certain proof that us humans can develop immunity to the virus after we get infected with it once.

Dr. Dan Barouch, who is a researcher at the Center for Virology and Vaccine Research at Harvard’s Beth Israel Deaconness Medical Center in Boston, said that the findings suggest that the monkeys “do develop natural immunity that protects against re-exposure.

It’s very good news.

Unfortunately, the COVID-19 disease keeps spreading, but at a slower rate than before, according to the stats brought by worldometers.info. China, the country where the virus started back in December 31, 2019, is currently occupying only the 13th place in the top affected countries by the new coronavirus. The top is led by the USA with most infections (over 1.5 million), followed by Russia (over 300,000), Brazil (almost 300,000), Spain (almost 280,000), UK (around 250,000), and others.

According to the same stats brought by worldometers.info, while the COVID-19 disease is facing a significant downfall in Europe besides the situation from Russia, the virus is still very active in the USA. Brazil is perhaps the most affected country in the recent days, as it has around 15,000 cases of daily infections and up to 1000 deaths per day.


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