NASA’s Crew to Cross the Moon’s Face Before the Grand Eclipse

NASA’s Crew to Cross the Moon’s Face Before the Grand Eclipse
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NASA’s picture taker Bill Ingalls caught the shot of the International Space Station traveling the full moon on Tuesday, January 30th. from Alexandria, Virginia.

The Super Blue Blood Moon is here

A staggering photograph demonstrates the International Space Station (ISS) crossing the face of the moon in the number one spot up to Wednesday, January 31st morning’s hotly anticipated “Super Blue Blood Moon” obscure.

Bill Ingalls, NASA’s photographer, caught the shot from Alexandria, Virginia, on January 31st, Tuesday, a day prior to the full moon dove into Earth’s shadow in the principal add up to lunar shroud since September 2015.

What’s the deal with this moon?

There’s significantly more to say in regards to Wednesday’s skywatching scene. The overshadowing included a moon that was both “blue” (it was the second full moon of January) and “super” (it was close to the nearest point to Earth along the moon’s circular circle).

The “blood” part, incidentally, alludes to the coppery-red shading the moon regularly expect amid an aggregate obscuration. This originates from rosy wavelengths of daylight refracted by Earth’s climate onto the lunar surface.

Such a shroud hadn’t happened anyplace on the planet since 1982, and not in the United States in over 150 years.

Who’s in the crew?

The ISS is at present completely staffed, with six crewmembers on board. They are NASA’s space explorers Joe Acaba, Mark Vande Hei and Scott Tingle and cosmonauts Alexander Misurkin and Anton Shkaplerov, together with Norishige Kanai of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency.

On the off chance that you’re pondering, it would appear that the space station’s group was not ready to see the Super Blue Blood Moon obscure. The shroud happened while the group was caught up with work, and the greater part of the station’s windows indicate down the Earth, making it difficult to get the moon see. Kanai shared that news Wednesday on Twitter after the lunar obscuration finished.


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