NASA Plans to Fine-Tune Precision Landing on Cosmic Objects Without The Need of a Pilot

NASA Plans to Fine-Tune Precision Landing on Cosmic Objects Without The Need of a Pilot
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Sending gears on other planets and other space objects for exploration is not actually something that you could plan from the comfort of your own house. It takes a lot of time, knowledge, and money. NASA did it so many times, but you know how things go in technology: there’s always a better way to get the job done.

The American space agency plans to land new spacecraft on the Moon and Mars for the near future, but such projects can end up targeting the wrong spots. Landing in a crater or boulder field is totally feasible, and a good plan is needed to avoid such an unpleasant scenario that could jeopardize the space exploration itself.

The Safe and Precise Landing – Integrated Capabilities Evolution (SPLICE) project saves the day

NASA aims to deploy a high-speed computer, laser sensors, a camera, and various algorithms for assuring the capability of a spacecraft to find a suitable landing area. Thus, the future probes will identify potential hazards and adjust course for the safest touchdown site. It’s all part of the Space Technology Mission Directorate’s Game Changing Development program.

The description, as posted by SciTech Daily, says:

“A new suite of lunar landing technologies, called Safe and Precise Landing – Integrated Capabilities Evolution (SPLICE), will enable safer and more accurate lunar landings than ever before. Future Moon missions could use NASA’s advanced SPLICE algorithms and sensors to target landing sites that weren’t possible during the Apollo missions, such as regions with hazardous boulders and nearby shadowed craters. SPLICE technologies could also help land humans on Mars.”

The upcoming Artemis mission aims to land a man and a woman on the Moon by 2024, as it will mark the return of humans to our natural satellite after a break of over half a century. If everything goes well (and there’s no reason why it shouldn’t), Mars will be the next destination.


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