NASA News: Asteroid Hits Earth Two Hours Since It Was Spotted

NASA News: Asteroid Hits Earth Two Hours Since It Was Spotted
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It’s been just revealed that an asteroid hit Earth two hours since it was spotted. It seems that it was too small to pose a hazard on Earth. Check out the latest reports here.

According to the latest reports, there was an asteroid around the size of a refrigerator was spotted hours before it hit Earth’s atmosphere. It’s important to note that it wasn’t dangerous, but it marked the fifth time in history an asteroid was detected right before hitting our planet.
SCMP notes that on March 11, astronomer Krisztian Sarneczky noticed an asteroid at the Piszkesteto Observatory in Hungary. Sarneczky reported it to the International Astronomical Union’s Minor Planet Center, which confirmed it was the first time the asteroid had been observed.
Nasa’s “Scout” system, constantly searches the Minor Planet Center’s database for any potential impacts.

It’s also important to note that it calculated the asteroid’s orbit, finding that the asteroid would certainly hit Earth.

Asteroid hits Earth 

According to the official notes, the system then notified the Center for Near Earth Object Studies at Nasa’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Southern California and other asteroid impact systems.Luckily for Earth, the asteroid, named 2022 EB5, was around two meters long – this is a size “too small to pose a hazard to Earth”, Nasa said in a statement.

As you can see in the video above, the animation shows asteroid 2022 EB5’s predicted orbit around the Sun before impacting into the Earth’s atmosphere on March 11, 2022. The asteroid – estimated to be about 6 ½ feet (2 meters) wide – was discovered two hours before impact. Using NASA’s Scout impact hazard assessment system, members of the Center for Near Earth Object Studies (CNEOS) – which is managed by NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Southern California – accurately predicted where and when the asteroid would harmlessly break up in Earth’s atmosphere. Infrasound sensors, which can detect low-frequency sound waves as they travel through the atmosphere, confirmed the impact occurred over the Norwegian Sea, southwest of Norway’s Jan Mayen island.


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Rada Mateescu

Passionate about subjects from the science and health-related areas, Rada has been blogging for about ten years and at Health Thoroughfare, she's covering the latest news on these niches.

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