Mysterious Earthquake Swarm Cause Finally Revealed

Mysterious Earthquake Swarm Cause Finally Revealed
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You may recall that back in 2016, there’s been a swarm of earthquakes that revved up in Southern California. These quakes did not occur on a daily basis, and it’s also worth noting that most of them were too small for people to feel. 

But they did continue to rumble and multiply, and by the spring of 2018, there were thousands of little quakes that were striking on a monthly basis, and some of them were large enough to set lamps swaying and put residents of the towns that are in the area on the edge.

National Geographic notes that over the past four years, there have been more than 22,000, but so far, the reason for all this seismic activity remained a mystery.

The website mentioned above noted that in one of the highest resolution looks at the seismic swarm that’s been seen until today, experts found a cause for which all this has been happening. The results could be helping geologists around the world to better untangle the underlying physics of earthquakes – large and small as well. 

Cause of earthquake swarms revealed 

What’s more important is that similar work could even enhance real-time earthquake monitoring as well. 
The famous online publication notes that the hi-res picture of the swarm’s progression is suggesting that the cluster of quakes was triggered by fluids being naturally injected into the fault system.

 

So, experts found that the fluids could be playing an important role in other swarms that are detected around the world as well. 

Overall, this method could turn out useful for improving global seismic analysis.

“The detail here is incredible,” according to seismologist Elizabeth Vanacore from the Puerto Rico Seismic Network at the University of Puerto Rico at Mayagüez. She continued and said: “This type of work is cutting edge and really where the science is going.”

We recommend that you check out the original article in order to learn more details. 


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