More Exoplanets Discovered at Just 11 Light Years Away

More Exoplanets Discovered at Just 11 Light Years Away
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Scientists have recently found at least two, and perhaps up to three planets, orbiting a close star. This planetary system is in fact so close that a new generation of telescopes should, in theory, be able to scrutinize the system for its potential chemical signatures of a living, breathing world. This information was published in a report in the academic journal Nature, last Thursday.

The star is known as GJ 887, or Gliese 887. The star was named for the scientist who put in place the entire catalogue of stars. GJ 887 is a red dwarf star, so it is not as hot as out star, nor is it a big. That red dwarf is 11 light-years away. This translates to 64 million miles, so, as far away as it might be for us, Gliese 887 is essentially our cosmic neighbor. There are only 11 star systems closer to our sun than this one.

Scientists have researched the light from the star for months on end and they could notice that it was being tugged by the gravity of the orbiting bodies. This information was published in a new report. These planets are located outside of our exoplanets and they are what scientists normally call exoplanets.

Carole Haswell, an author of the paper and an expert on exoplanets at the Open University in London, explained that she would truly enjoy to go around and explore. The researcher believes that she likes to believe that that is the direction in which human adventure is headed to.

At its most basic level, this discovery is the latest reminder that planets around stars are regular. Nobody knew this just a generation ago, before, in 1995, the hunt for exoplanets had been started by researchers. In 1995, Swiss astronomers mentioned that they had found an exoplanet orbiting the star known as 51 Pegasi.


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