Moderate Drinking Helps Reduce Potential for Dementia but don’t Open the Bottle yet

Moderate Drinking Helps Reduce Potential for Dementia but don’t Open the Bottle yet
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Alcohol research has had some very mystifying results that nobody can follow because they are incredibly contradictory. Some say to drink more because it may improve your health, while others feel like even moderate drinking will kill you. According to a new study it seems that both abstinence and heavy drinking can induce dementia, the bottom line being a moderate consumption of alcohol.

This is not a reason to rejoice and start a weekly plan of moderate drinking. While it may help with dementia, alcohol can still cause other diseases. The study involved people aged between 35 and 55 years of age while they reported on an established basis how much they had to drink. The purpose of the study was to see the percentage of dementia cases over the next two or three decades.

From approximately 9000 initial participants, almost 400 of them developed dementia. The results were as follows: heavy drinkers had an increased risk of 40% of having dementia compared with moderate drinkers. Heavy drinkers are defined as those that consume 14 or more units of alcohol per week, while moderate drinkers ingest between 1 and 14 units. With each seven units the risk for dementia increases by 17%.

Those that didn’t drink at all also presented a high risk, 47% as opposed to moderate drinkers. Supposedly, alcohol helps in reducing brain inflammation, supporting circulation and helps the brain to get rid of harmful proteins during sleep (proteins which may cause Alzheimer’s, for example).

It’s too early to say that moderate drinking definitely helps against dementia. So, if you currently aren’t drinking, then don’t start to do it now, hoping to cash in on the health benefits. Even the study’s authors don’t encourage abstinent drinkers to crack bottles open.


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