Meteor Spotted by Almost 500 People in US

Meteor Spotted by Almost 500 People in US
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Almost 500 people in the Southeastern United States had a big surprise looking at the sky in the early morning. Five hundred people in eight states had reported a slow and bright fireball around 6:50 A.M. Those reports came to the American Meteor Society from North and South Carolina. But reports also came from Florida, Kentucky, Alabama, Georgia, Tennessee, and Virginia. Also, people from the Charlotte area have reported, call WSOC and posted on social media that they have seen what seems to be a meteor light in the sky.

Moreover, the reports indicate that the meteor was traveling from west to east. And almost a week ago, the AMS was assaulted with 260 stories from people in 14 states about the same subject: a fireball in the sky. The fact is that meteors peak in April, and because they are pieces of rock that vaporize when entering the Earth’s atmosphere, the result is seen by us like a streak of light.

Some meteorologist, like John Ahrens, spoke to the residents of Monroe, who declared that they saw the meteor when they were leaving to work. They saw it was green and purple around the front of the flame, that it last longer than expected, and they even recorded videos on their phones. Most of them are marveled about the phenomenon and never seen anything like that.

Also, this is the second large meteor sighting over the East coast in the same weak, the first been reported on Sunday in Florida. Jack Howard, the professor from the Charlotte Astronomy Club, says that the fireball was moving from 10 to 40,000 mph. And Popular Science explains to us that is around 60 tons of space dust coming from comets and meteors that fall every day, but it’s generally minimal.

Finally, Professor Howard, says that thing like that aren’t rare, and NASA estimates 48 tons of meteoritic material fall on Earth, every day. And the meteor seen now was a large, isolated object, maybe a chunk of asteroid, heated up in the atmosphere because of friction.


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