It’s Official, We Can’t Save the Glaciers Anymore

It’s Official, We Can’t Save the Glaciers Anymore
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Recently, the researchers from the Universities of Innsbruck and Bremen studied the melting of glaciers. According to sources, this has been a worrying topic for decades now, and the findings merely come to confirm it. According to the study, we cannot prevent the melting of glaciers anymore in the current century.

How Is That Possible?

Most likely, you already know the rate at which our pollution causes the glaciers to melt. Due to the fact that glaciers have a slow reaction to the climate change process, our activity will leave traces even long after the 21st century. This translates to the fact that 500 meters we make by car (with a mid-range vehicle) will equal to one kg of glacier ice melted.

Going back to the Paris Agreement, we see that the 195 member states agreed to work to limiting the rise in the global average temperature. Their goal was to take it below 2° C., and even 1.5 °C above the levels that were found in the pre-industrial era.

Will We Achieve This Goal?

Ben Marzeion and Nicolas Champollion, who work at the Institute of Geography at the University of Bremen, worked together with Fabien Maussion and Georg Kaser, from the Institute of Atmospheric and Cryospheric Sciences in Innsbruck. Together, they found out that it will really make no difference if we manage to lower it by 2 degrees or just 1.5 for the next 100 years.

However, it does matter if you look beyond this century. As we mentioned in the beginning, glaciers react slowly to the changes in the climate. This means that if we still want to preserve our current volume, we need to reach a temperature level that existed in pre-industrial times. Sadly, this cannot happen. But if we start to take measures regarding climate change as soon as possible, this will impact the glaciers in the future, slowly, but surely.


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